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Does Cough CPR Work?

Does Cough CPR Work? | The Survival Doctor

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Last week I wrote about deciding what to do if you have chest pain far away from expert help. Several comments on that post and on Facebook suggested vigorous and repetitive coughing could be tried. Since that suggestion is found far and wide on the Internet, I decided to check out, as best I could, whether there was any truth behind it.

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Wilderness Heart Attack: Should You Walk or Wait?

Wilderness Heart Attack: Should You Walk or Wait? | The Survival Doctor

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

If you have a heart attack in the wilderness, it’s judgment-call time. In my last post, I talked about the fact that you’ll have to weigh walking for help with waiting for help that you don’t even know is coming. Walking could damage your heart further. Waiting could postpone care too long.

In this post, we’ll go into the details of how I’d make the decision.

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Wilderness Heart Attacks: When There’s No Perfect Choice

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by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Many years ago, my wife and I were in Arizona to attend a conference. We had several hours to kill until the first meeting that night, so I decided we’d make a quick trip to the Grand Canyon. Then, I calculated we had three hours to kill before we had to leave and decided we should hike the trail down the Canyon, at least for a bit.

Well, I miscalculated the extra time and effort it would take to walk back up, so the hike became a speed walk. With about a mile to go, I heard my wife from behind me yell, “I think I’m having a heart attack.”

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15 of the Worst Things to Do If You’re Stranded in the Cold

#3: Don’t rub your skin to warm up. It brings blood away from your core and to the surface. You feel warmer, but ...

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

In 2002, a couple of years after he won the Olympic gold medal in wrestling, Rulon Gardner went snowmobiling in Wyoming. “I told myself it would be a short trip,” he told the Associated Press. “We were going to go out about three hours and get home for dinner.”

But he got lost and ended up stranded for 17 hours. The temperature reached as low as 25 below zero, according to the AP.

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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: The Sneaky Way It Kills

The sneaky way carbon monoxide poisoning kills. | The Survival Doctor

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

A reader emailed to remind me there’s been a spate of carbon monoxide poisonings and several carbon monoxide deaths to go along with the cold weather in the Northeast United States. To me, that sort of news is always so troubling because even though carbon monoxide is a stealthy killer, the deaths are so preventable. All you need is a

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5 Life-Threatening Injuries That Are Totally Survivable During a Disaster—if You Know How

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by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

I get a gnawing feeling in my stomach when I hear stories of people who died from an injury they might have survived if they’d just known a little more basic medicine. Or maybe they knew but just weren’t thinking right at the time.

And then there are the people who saved lives with well-applied tourniquets and other techniques, makeshift or otherwise, that often aren’t even taught in typical first-aid classes. If you’d like to know more about such techniques, I do have a video course.

Getting a devastating injury doesn’t always equal a death sentence, even if you’re in a disaster or homesteading or otherwise unable to get immediate professional help. If you know the right things to do, you may be able to survive—or save the life of a loved one.

Here are my best tips to deal with five life-threatening injuries when you can’t get to a doctor, until you can. (In addition to all these tips, have someone quickly call 911 if possible.) My suggestion is to put these to memory.

1. Deep Wound to an Extremity

Most common immediate threat to life: Blood loss.

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Measles Outbreak 2015: What’s the Big Deal?

Measles outbreak 2015: What's the big deal? This is. | The Survival Doctor

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Every year we have a few measles outbreaks in the U.S., but they’re still pretty limited to a few hundred people. You’ve probably heard about the most recent one that started in Disneyland and may have led to over 100 people getting the measles so far in 2015.

The worry is the outbreaks are going to get more frequent and bigger, and that’s not just because of people coming to the U.S. from countries where fewer children are vaccinated, as some have speculated. The percentage of children getting vaccinated in the U.S. is down to 91 percent. Compare that to 89 percent in Mexico, for example, and you can see there’s not a lot of difference.

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How Long Do Flu Symptoms Last? 10 FAQs

How long do the flu symptoms last? Here are more flu answers from The Survival Doctor: http://www.thesurvivaldoctor.com/2015/02/02/how-long-do-flu-symptoms-last/.

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Doc, how call I tell the flu from a cold? Should I get seen? How long do the flu symptoms last?

Both online and in clinic, I get a lot of questions about the flu. In this post I’ll answer some of the most commonly asked.

Q: How do I know if I have the flu?

A: When seeing a patient for aches, pains, and fever, here are some of the clues that make me think I’m dealing with the flu:

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Follow-Up Survey: What Will Help You Best Prepare?

The Survival Doctor survey: How can I help you best?

by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

Two weeks ago, I asked what you want to learn more about this year. The most popular answer was “advanced” techniques.

Last week, I covered some really advanced questions about smoke inhalation—even ones experts have trouble answering. You responded by making that article the most popular post with subscribers in almost three months. Thanks. I’ll keep going in this direction.

I have one more important set of questions for you, and then we’ll get back to survival medicine.

This year, I want to create the products you need—things that fill gaps and help you prepare in practical ways. So I’ve created a brief follow-up survey about that.

If you’d like to have your voice heard (whether or not you took the first survey), please click here. (There are only five questions.) I’m really listening, and I hope we can make this the best year yet for your medical prepping.

Thanks for your support.

>> Take the survey.

Smoke Inhalation: What to Do If You’re Trapped

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by James Hubbard, MD, MPH

The recent train disaster in Washington, D.C., reminded me that I haven’t covered smoke inhalation in my posts.

Picture this. You’re on a subway going through a tunnel when you hear a loud pop. The train stops, the lights go out, and the air starts filling with smoke. And it’s getting worse.

A voice comes over the intercom. “The train is not on fire. Please, everyone, sit on the floor and wait for help.” The voice orders you not to open the doors. You’re trapped.

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