Doctor Teaches How to Save Lives With Honey and Duct Tape in New Survival Books

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Doctor Teaches How to Save Lives With Honey and Duct Tape in New Survival Books

"The Survival Doctor's Guide to Wounds"

 

“The Survival Doctor” Aims to Prepare Public for Next Katrina, Earthquake or Terrorist Attack Through Two New, Interactive Survival Books Teaching Do-It-Yourself Medicine.

Colorado Springs, Colo., July 11, 2012—When you get a bad injury, the usual advice is to call 911. But what if there is no 911? What if you’re in another Hurricane Katrina or a terrorist attack?

That’s what one family doctor is preparing people for in two new interactive e-books: “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Wounds” and “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Burns,” available from TheSurvivalDoctor.com July 17.

If your child gashed his foot on a piece of debris, your wife got shot or your husband were scorched from a fire, would you know what to do? “Most people know basic first aid, but you only learn advanced techniques in medical school,” says James Hubbard, a family doctor in Colorado Springs, Colo., who wrote the survival books and runs the website TheSurvivalDoctor.com. “Everyone deserves the chance to survive,” he says. “I think of this every time I see another disaster. There are probably people dying who don’t have to.”

But just because he’s teaching advanced knowledge doesn’t mean you have to have advanced supplies. “Honey is a great substitute for antibiotic ointment. Bacteria can’t live in it. That’s why it never spoils,” Hubbard says. “You can even close wounds with duct tape.” There are some wounds that shouldn’t be closed, though, such as big ones that won’t stop bleeding with pressure. He goes over those details in “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Wounds.”"The Survival Doctor's Guide to Burns"

Both books—fewer than 50 pages each—are written in everyday language, and they’re interactive. When you’re reading about one topic, if you want to go more in-depth, you just click on a link and get taken to another section. Then you click back to where you left off. There are also links to videos that demonstrate some of the makeshift techniques, such as twisting hair a certain way to close up a head wound.

Dr. Hubbard has been a family doctor for over 30 years. He started out in his small Mississippi hometown, where patients taught him all kinds of home remedies. He now practices in Colorado Springs.

For the first 24 hours of publication Dr. Hubbard is offering a 25-percent discount on “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Wounds” and “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Burns.” Visit www.TheSurvivalDoctor.com for more information.

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About TheSurvivalDoctor.com

Family doctor James Hubbard teaches how to survive disasters when you can’t get to a doctor. He runs the blog TheSurvivalDoctor.com and is the author of the new e-books “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Wounds” and “The Survival Doctor’s Guide to Burns.”

Created by James Hubbard, M.D., M.P.H., the blog TheSurvivalDoctor.com teaches makeshift survival medicine for disasters. Posts are easy to read and practical. TheSurvivalDoctor.com launched in September 2011. It has reached a readership of 150,000 per month—and growing.


Media Contact

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