How to Stop Excessive Gas: 5 Steps

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How to Stop Excessive Gas: 5 Steps

Gas, flatulence, farting … whatever you call it, you don’t want it! Here are five stops to stop gas before it ever starts—including what foods to avoid.

[Editor's note: This article was originally hosted on MyFamilyDoctorMag.com, our sister site.
It's now featured here as part of our new general-health section.]

whoopie-cushion-gasby Jonathan Schreiber, M.D.

Gas, flatulence, farting … whatever you call it, you don’t want it! Here are five stops to stop gas before it ever starts.

  1. Eliminate carbonated drinks. These introduce gas into your stomach, which can end up in your intestines.
  2. When stressed, try breathing in slowly through your nose and out through your mouth. Some people swallow air without realizing it, usually when they’re anxious. This can cause burping or flaulence.
  3. Avoid antacids. Though they’re marketed as anti-gas, they actually create gas when they neutralize stomach acid.
  4. Consider your food tolerance. Most intestinal gas comes from bacteria in the colon when foods are incompletely digested. The best example is lactose intolerance—the inability to digest a sugar in milk products. Avoiding dairy is the most effective treatment.
  5. Limit usual food causes. Foods like beans, cabbage and onions can cause gas in the same way as dairy.The Survival Doctor's Guides to Burns and Wounds, by @James Hubbard

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JONATHAN SCHRIBER, M.D.,
is a board-certified gastroenterologist with Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Md., and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

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Article o
riginally appeared in January/February 2008 issue of My Family Doctor magazine. Bio current as of that issue. This general health-care information is not meant as individual advice. Please see our disclaimer.

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